Real Estate and Land Ownership in Steps To Salvation

Real Estate and Land Ownership in Steps To Salvation

I know many readers will not like my ideas about real estate. But after studying history and living in a world where elitists amass unlimited amounts of real estate and use it to control others, I know my concept of real estate and land ownership in Salvation Time is right. One of the most enjoyable things about writing my book was fusing fact and fiction to make my points. With real estate, I took this report from excellent journalist/blogger Stacy McCain about New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio’s actual motivation for wanting to outlaw iconic Central Park horse and carriage rides:

“The bad guy in this drama, according to the carriage drivers, is Steve Nislick, chief executive officer of a New Jersey-based real-estate development company, Edison Properties. The company ‘employs legions of lobbyists to influence city decisions on real estate and zoning in its favor,’ journalist Michael Gross reported in 2009, pointing out that two of Edison’s businesses ‘have multiple locations in the same Far West Midtown neighborhood as the stables where the Central Park horses are housed.’ An anti-carriage pamphlet Nislick circulated in 2008 made this interesting observation: ‘Currently, the stables consist of 64,000 square feet of valuable real estate on lots that could accomodate up to 150,000 square feet of development. These lots could be sold for new development.’

Gross asked the obvious question: ‘What are the odds that good neighbor Nislick, the out-of-state real estate developer, simply covets those valuable, underdeveloped New York lots — and has teamed up with ambitious pols to use the emotions of animal rights activists as fuel for their own agendas?’”

Since my characters travel to New York City in Step Three, I decided to incorporate McCain’s story into a fictional event 400 years into the future when four Arusha City teens decide to take a romantic horse and carriage ride through Central Park:

“Wow, this is so beautiful!” Ruth Bader Ginsberg gushed. She was seated with Mao Tse Tung, Golda Meir and George Chamberlain in a lovely carriage pulled by a magnificent white horse through New York’s famous Central Park. Earlier that day the boys had surprised both girls with an invitation to experience one of the city’s most famous attractions during their free time. When the foursome had arrived at Central Park South between 5th and 6th avenues Ruth and Golda squealed with delight at all of the gorgeous horses just waiting to offer tourists an unforgettable ride through Central Park and Manhattan.

Their friendly carriage driver Marty—a tall, handsome guy with sparkling blue eyes and a warm smile—welcomed them to the city and offered them a hand into the elegant, old-fashioned transport.

“Welcome to New York City! I’m honored to be the one taking you on this tour of Central Park. This here’s Liberty,” he explained with a nod to the horse. Then as they settled into the black cushioned seat he asked, “So, are you all enjoying your stay so far?”

“Yeah, it’s great! I’ve never seen so many skyscrapers, museums and stores in one place!” Golda exclaimed. “But I think this is going to be my favorite part of New York.”

The sun was beginning to set, filtering golden rays of light through the trees and casting an orange glow on the tall buildings in the distance.

“Mine too,” George agreed, placing an arm about her and giving her an affectionate squeeze.

As Marty led the horse out of the line-up and onto the tour route he explained how this longstanding New York City tradition had nearly been destroyed by a corrupt, collectivist mayor named Bill De Blasio.

“Wait! I thought the carriage rides made a lot of money for the city,” Tung challenged. “Why would a mayor want to outlaw them? Wouldn’t people like you lose their jobs if that happened?”

STSGinsberg

“Absolutely! But Mayor De Blasio didn’t care about any of that. He was in cahoots with his greedy real estate crony Steve Nislick. I know for a fact you guys studied collectivism in your history class. De Blasio was nothing more than a modern-day communist who used propaganda very effectively. He claimed he wanted to outlaw horse and carriage rides because of animal cruelty. But as with all commies, the reality did not match the rhetoric. In truth, he and Nislick wanted to seize the 64,000 acres the horse stables stood on so that they could develop hotels and make even more money for themselves—the little people be damned!”

“Wow that is unbelievable!” Ruth exclaimed.

“Well, it was the End Days,” Mao reminded her. “It’s bad but not surprising.”

“Yeah, it kind of reminds me of my ancestor’s horrible Kelo decision to seize private property,” she sighed. “Except this was about taking good jobs away from good people and ruining other people’s fun.”

“So what happened, Marty?” Golda asked. “I mean, obviously they didn’t get their way or we wouldn’t be here right now.”

“No ma’am, they did not, thanks as always to ordinary people who fought back. It was a tough go for a while but common sense prevailed. That’s one reason why in Salvation Time no one person is allowed to own more than 50 farming acres and they cannot own more than three private residences. Commercial real estate is limited to either five shopping centers or 25 stores, whichever is greater. And when a homeowner dies, they cannot leave their home to their children unless there’s a physical or mental handicap that would create a hardship by moving them. Otherwise, they must sell the home. Of course, they keep the money from the sale but the house must transfer ownership to someone else, a non-relative. Many people complained about that at first but it’s to prevent the out-of-control corruption we had in the End Days when a single person could own unlimited real estate and use it to control and manipulate others.”

The teens listened attentively before a thoughtful Chamberlain had another question.

“Marty, can I ask you something?”

“Sure!”

“You seem like a really intelligent guy. I’m not putting down your line of work but something tells me you haven’t always been a carriage driver.”

He burst out laughing while Golda gave her beau a sharp nudge, believing it to be a rude question.

“Thanks for the compliment, George,” he answered. “You’re right I haven’t always done this for a living. After I had a great career in finance and made plenty of money helping entrepreneurs achieve their dreams I decided I wanted to do something less stressful with my life. So here I am.”

“Good for you!” Ruth enthused.

“Shall we continue?” Marty asked, his azure eyes twinkling. The foursome gave him a hearty “yes” in unison. Then clearing his throat he announced his official transition from friendly political junkie to formal tour guide as he began to share factual information about passing landmarks.

What do you think of my ideas about limiting real estate ownership? Too much? Just right?

Contact me to continue the conversation. Preview and purchase Steps To Salvation here.

Welcome to the White House Museum, Circa 2412

In my post No More Political Dynasties, I explained why all countries of the world — not just the United States — must abandon the idea of centralized power, especially when it’s concentrated and passed down through the same families. Whether it’s Kennedy, Bush, or Clinton the entitlement mentality of members of elite political families is a threat to individual liberty.

That’s why in Step Three of my book, I wrote a scene in which Mr. Bauer and his students visit Washington D.C. and the White House Museum – Former Residence of the President of the United States. Their tour guide has a very familiar name, too:

“Hello everyone, my name is Piper Palin and I’ll be your tour guide for the White House Museum today,” a lovely young woman of about 25 years announced with a smile. She had long, shiny, chestnut-colored hair, hazel eyes and a genuine disposition as she greeted the Arusha travelers outside of the building that once housed US Presidents and their families during the End Days. Although it was a hot, humid Washington D.C. morning Piper’s crisp, neat appearance was completely unaffected. Kissinger looked at her in amazement as he wiped his sweaty brow with his handkerchief and felt the moisture beginning to saturate his shirt. He couldn’t wait to get inside the air-conditioned building.

Later, students Hillary Rodham and Debbie Wasserman-Schultz have this exchange as they take in the sight of the very last presidential portrait:

Once inside the cool building Piper led them through the Oval Office, various parlors and eventually the Rose Garden, pointing out the historical significance of each attraction. Large framed photos of US Presidents from George Washington to Sarah Palin still graced the walls but Piper had been quick to point out that her great-great grandmother was the last one to have had the honor—and only because of intense pressure from everyday citizens who were thrilled to have elected her the first female President of the United States. Palin’s administration had initiated the 400-year tradition of presidents and their cabinets living in their own humble homes, working in modest offices and driving their own cars to and from work.

“Wow, she’s even more beautiful than her internet pictures,” Hillary gasped as she and Debbie stood staring at the painting.

“Beauty, brains and accomplishment—no wonder so many people liked her!”

“Yes, and what a great leader too,” Debbie agreed. “When the rest of the world had abandoned Israel, she stood by Eyal Grad. I can see why she was one of the Salvation Twelve.”

The students George W. Bush and Bill Clinton are also affected deeply by the experience:
Nearby, George W. Bush took in the sight of his ancestor’s portrait with utter amazement. He couldn’t believe he looked exactly like the 43rd President of the United States—except for his dark black skin, of course. Even though he’d seen pictures of G.W. Bush on the internet, the larger-than-life portrait showcased their shared facial features with shocking clarity. For the longest time all he could do was stare at it. Standing in the Oval Office, young Bill Clinton thought back to the Monica Lewinsky scandal that had nearly ruined his ancestor’s presidency.

Although he felt shame for President William Jefferson Clinton’s lack of decorum and judgment in luring a much younger woman into the people’s house for sex, he was thankful to have chosen the same kind of family libido for this incarnation. As he strolled around the room it occurred to him that perhaps he could become a filmmaker like Spielberg—except he would produce pornography films for Sin City in Arusha. Maybe someday he could even become an owner of a porno production company, too. This would be a safe way for him to satisfy his sexual urges without hurting anyone else and it would certainly be in line with his Life Purpose Class results which had pointed him toward a career in the arts. Bill smiled as he visualized his success.

In this new reality called Salvation Time, all politicians live in their own homes (which they pay for with their own money), drive themselves to work in their own cars (which they also pay for themselves) and do the people’s business in modest offices. Governments are streamlined and operate efficiently on a very tight budget because all of the material trappings of power have been stripped away. This enables everyday people to freely pursue their goals and thrive personally and professionally in a system of positive capitalism.

What do you think? Do you agree we should eliminate political dynasties? How do you feel about turning the White House into a museum? Contact me to continue the conversation.

President Andrew Jackson in Steps To Salvation

President Andrew Jackson in Steps To Salvation

For all of his faults, one of my favorite US Presidents is Andrew Jackson because he understood the dangers of centralized banking and stood up courageously for the everyday working man and woman. Possibly due to his own humble and tragic childhood, Jackson was a champion for the rights of all individuals to live in freedom with plenty of opportunities to succeed.

That is why he (along with Abraham Lincoln) is featured prominently in Steps One and Two of my book. Nathan Rothschild tells the story of President Andrew Jackson during his exam answer in Mr. Bauer’s history class:

“In the 19th century two American presidents, Andrew Jackson and Abraham Lincoln fought back and won against the centralized banking system of their time, The Bank of the United States. Jackson was a war hero. He defeated the British Army in the Battle of New Orleans during the War of 1812. The troops under his command nicknamed him ‘Old Hickory’ because he was ‘as tough as hickory.’ He respected the people’s will because of his own humble start in life. When he was a boy, he’d been a prisoner of war during the American Revolution until his widowed mother rescued him. Then she died and left him an orphan.

“Jackson always stood up for the rights of everyday working people. This helped him win the popular vote and an electoral majority during the Election of 1828. He believed the Bank of the United States gave too much power over the American economy to private bankers. That became the main issue of the 1832 Election. Jackson won re-election while he fought with Nicholas Biddle, the country’s first central banker. People called him ‘Czar Nicholas.’ Biddle made life very hard for small businesses and individuals by raising interest rates and controlling the money supply.

“But President Andrew Jackson won. He destroyed the US Bank and paid off the national debt. It’s part of his unique legacy because he’s the only president in the history of the United States to do it. It is kind of funny that even though Jackson always liked gold and not paper money, he still ended up on the American twenty-dollar bill.”

Then later in Step Two, Advanced Soul and former US President Andrew Jackson applauds Israeli Prime Minister Eyal Grad for the creation of the Citizens Lottery System and offers this brief history lesson that includes an important point about the nature of humanity:

“Mr. Grad, as you may already know during my time on earth I was known as the first working-class president,” Jackson continued. “As an orphaned young man who raised himself out of poverty after my experience as a POW during the American Revolution, the plight of the common man was always foremost on my mind. Oh yes, I did some things I’m not proud of during my time on earth, including killing thousands of native Americans at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend. While in human form, we’re capable of exceptional acts of heroism and accomplishment, and regrettable acts of barbarism and cruelty. I was certainly no exception to this rule when I inhabited an earthly body known as Andrew Jackson, seventh President of the United States.

“After I defeated the British in the Battle of New Orleans, many Americans called me ‘The Second George Washington’ and ‘The Hero.’ It wasn’t long before I heeded the call to run for the highest office in the land because it was my opportunity to take a stand against the centralized banking system. Centralized banks controlled the circulation and availability of money to the detriment of decent, everyday working people. As a relentless champion for common folks I was determined to put an end to this money monopoly.

“When I decided to run for President I knew I had to base my platform on revoking the charter of the Bank of the United States because it had too much power over the American economy through private bankers. We’d seen this throughout history with centralized banks like the Bank of England and the money traders of Biblical and Roman times. To a humble frontiersman like me, the Bank of the United States—with its board of directors tied to industry and manufacturing—was naturally biased in favor of the urban and industrial northern states. It was also unconstitutional and antithetical to the principles of individual liberty and equality.”

I highly recommend watching this excellent documentary on the exceptional life of President Andrew Jackson. There’s much more in the novel about him and his accomplishments on earth, so this is just a small taste.

Want to continue the conversation about money? Contact me here.